Instar Glasscraft

Privacy window 1.JPG

Privacy Windows

A client asked for a Privacy Window for a bathroom. “I don’t want anyone to be able to see inside, but don’t make it too dark either.” I chose large amber shapes, with bevels and colored accents. The photo on the right shows the window with “outside” light bounding off the surface. The photo on the left was taken at night, inside. The center photo captures daylight entering the room, displaying traces of outdoor vegetation. It’s like two windows in one.

Privacy window 3.jpg
Privacy window 2.jpg

Bevels 3.JPG

Beveled Party Favors

For a VERY important birthday I made stained glass party favors for my guests. Our theme was Dudley Do-Right — two sisters came as Natasha No-Good and the Muse from Fractured Fairy Tales. Each window repeated the pattern of beveled glass, with variations in the colors for each piece — guests chose their favorites.

Bevels 1.JPG
Bevels 4.JPG

Fibonacci 2.jpg
Fibonacci 1.jpg

Fibonacci

The glass panels on the top left have just been soldered, and they are held up to the sun for the first time. Compare them with the panels on the bottom left — still on the work surface. Notice the vivid orange on the sunlit windows, in contrast to the subdued orange on the right. Stained glass in the home appears translucent in the daylight, and opaque at night (reflecting ambient house lighting). It’s Two — Two — Two windows in One!

A friend asked for windows that would follow the numbers from the Fibonacci series — 1 + 1 = 2, 2 + 1 = 3, 3 + 2 = 5, 5 + 3 = 8, 8 + 5 = 13. We decided to split up the “8” and “13 ” iterations of the series into conical sections for a more varied effect.

Fibonacci 3.JPG

Dimensions: about one square foot.

Dimensions: about one square foot.

Solar Eclipse

These two windows represent an abstraction of a total solar eclipse. The blue-green curve of earth lies beneath the daytime blue sky, while above the dark shape is tracing its trajectory (red or orange). The dark circular orb is not actually black — it’s a nearly opaque red, through which one can actually see the sun, but nothing else.

Eclipse Red.jpg
 

Most of the pieces in these windows follow this pattern. But to fit the rondel in the center, I adapted the design (below).

Most of the pieces in these windows follow this pattern. But to fit the rondel in the center, I adapted the design (below).

Rondel Pattern.jpg
The blue within the rondel determined the blue of the triangles, complimented by the lighter blue of the squares. The central hexagon is a deep translucent cobalt, despite its black appearance in this photo.

The blue within the rondel determined the blue of the triangles, complimented by the lighter blue of the squares. The central hexagon is a deep translucent cobalt, despite its black appearance in this photo.

Rondels

Are four rondel better than just one?   I thought I’d find out with this green/red window. I chose to use more than just one red shade — the triangles and center square are magenta. The border is a very deep green which only lights up in direct sunlight. All windows in this section are 16.5” x 10”.

Are four rondel better than just one? I thought I’d find out with this green/red window. I chose to use more than just one red shade — the triangles and center square are magenta. The border is a very deep green which only lights up in direct sunlight. All windows in this section are 16.5” x 10”.

The colors of the rondel suggested all the shades of glass (except the textured clear glass, which I included in all the windows os this page). The third shade of yellow in the hexagons is three-dimensional, due to the thickness of the rondel. A friend thought the blue/yellow elements suggested the flag of Sweden — or IKEA. But you won’t find this kind of window in a place like that!

The colors of the rondel suggested all the shades of glass (except the textured clear glass, which I included in all the windows os this page). The third shade of yellow in the hexagons is three-dimensional, due to the thickness of the rondel. A friend thought the blue/yellow elements suggested the flag of Sweden — or IKEA. But you won’t find this kind of window in a place like that!


Study triptych 5.jpg
Study triptych 4.jpg

Square Spiral

For decades I’ve admired abstract art. The two smaller windows were crafted side by side, with variation in the upper section. Direct sun light reveals their deep textures. At night the windows take on a different aspect — more subdued. 

“Square Spiral” is the name I’ve given to the central panel. I built a study piece to determine its size. I chose several pieces of “mottled” glass to catch sunlight at different intensities. I’m not done with the design yet — the next version will spiral out four pieces of the same color rather than three. 

Study triptych 1.jpg
Study triptych 2.jpg
Study triptych 3.jpg

Door window 2.JPG

Door Window

This was my first large project, undertaken with my first teacher, my father-in-law Roy — the man responsible for my stained glass addiction. In my studio, when I surprise myself with sudden expertise, I find myself thinking, hey, thanks, Roy!

I found this design in The Book of Signs, and it’s an ancient abstraction of the Christian Trinity. The primal  blue triangle (Tillich’s Ground of our Being) brings forth the cross, symbol of Christ — and this wood-patterned glass is wonderful to craft. The hovering Spirit also suggests the final Greek letter: Omega. That in turn suggests an “Alpha” for the blue triangle — the top of an “A”. 

 
Door window 1.jpg
Door window 4.jpg
Door window 3.jpg

Bevels 2JPG.JPG

Party Favor

This window is a close up of one of the ”party favor” pieces found in this section. It measures 5” x 8” (two “Fibonacci” numbers).


Step stone.JPG

Stepping Stones

Stepping stones are easier to put together than windows, and they’re a fun way to put smaller glass pieces to good use.