Instar Glasscraft

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Celtic Cross Window

I was asked to create a window for an Episcopal priest moving from California’s Central Valley to serve a church in Oahu. She chose the color of the Celtic cross. The upper quadrants suggest the bread and wine of the Communion service. Frank Lloyd Wright designed an abstract wheat stalk, which I adapted into a stalk bending in the wind (the red chunk suggests a ladybug). The central valley is well suited for table (and wine) grapes.

The lower left quadrant suggests a Hawaiian plumeria, and the lower right depicts the “hanging lobster claw” (heliconia) which flourishes in “the islands.”

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URI Window

The United Religions Initiative is modeled on the peacekeeping work of the United Nations. An Episcopal bishop, Bill Swing, began this project in 1995, and works with his staff to promote inter-religious understanding and reduce violence between world religions. Their headquarters in San Francisco coordinates programs around the world.

I suggested this design to Bishop Swing, based on their web site’s logo (including the child’s pinwheel). I used copper foil (not lead) and made a border of zinc for stability. I suggest that the letter “i” is shining a light. The octagon at the pinwheel’s center went through several versions.

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Master Gardeners Logo Window

After my wife took the training to be a Master Gardener, we planned to make a gift for their new director. I made two windows side by side. We presented the director with the first, and the other we donated for the benefit auction held at the annual celebration for the Master Gardener program.

Logo from the Master Gardeners web site.

Logo from the Master Gardeners web site.

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St. Francis Window

When Brother Jude, Provincial of the Anglican Franciscans, asked me to create a gift for a special presentation, I decided to add a border that would call to mind four images from St. Francis’ exuberant praise in his nature poem “Canticle of the Sun”. On the left is Brother Sun rising at dawn, complimented by Sister Moon above. Brother Fire on the right manages not to quench Sister Water below.

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